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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the legalization of pot. the world is changing, nina. >> it is. after losing proposition aids in california, democrats were devastated -- proposition 8 in california, democrats were devastated. people talk about marriage, love,ommient. they changed the message. they wanted what everyone else wanted and people understood that and they are beginning to succeed everywhere except the south. >> jerry brown got the tax in california. >> jerry brown did something for which he deserves credit. he was elected governor and he said i will not raise taxes unless i have the approval of the people of this date. to rescue the state's of california public school system, he went and said we need a tax increase. we need a tax increase of billions. and they voted for ed. i say hat's off to him and to californians for stepping up. >> legalizing marijuana nationwide? >> hats off also for the date marriage issue to joe biden who stepped up and said -- for the gay marriage issue it to joe biden who stepped up and said he was born at. that set a tone for the president and the vice president of the united states to
a lot of time in california, illinois, new york, texas. those are four states that the candidates did not spend much time if at all this year with the exception of going to fund raise. that shows how different things are now. >> woodruff: richard, it's certainly not that there hasn't been partisanship. it's a matter of... whether there's been geographic partisanship. >> that's well put, judy. ohio, for example, for most of its history for well over 100 years has stood out. it's been the mother of presidents and the maker of presidents. it's the country in microcosm. it is urban. it is rural. it is agricultural. it is industrial. it is a strong tradition of organized labor. it has significant minority populations. if you were going to disstill the united states in the mid 20th century at the end of the 20th century, you know, you'd be hard pressed to do better than ohio. in some ways it makes a lot of sense that ohio has attracted as much attention as it has. >> ifill: michael and richard, let's think about california. big, big state. very diverse. densely populated. has farms. it has
the latest edition of california political week or cal-peak, this speaks to what we were talking about. how the republican party has lost its edge particularly among latinos, women young voters. in california, my state california republican party used to have 63.2% of voter registration. registered voters in california. republicans. today, for the first time, voter -- republican voter registration in california, this is according to cal-peak has fallen below 30%. democrats hold every statewide office and both the united states senators and of course the big majority of the united states congressional delegation. republican party bob mulholland use to the work for me as political director of the party. is quoted as saying wolves have a better chance of getting off the endangered species list than republicans. [ laughter ] >> bill: the more tea party they get the more they leave average americans behind. the more they're in decline as a party. here is a person -- some of that may be up close and personal. ginger gibson, politi
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sweep all of the competitive races that we have in california in order to get even close to the 25. >> a couple of house races in which an incumbent is in danger, first in maryland. >> roscoe bartlett is a victim of democratic redistricting where he used to represent western maryland and now comes down to montgomery county and the washington, d.c. suburbs. he faces delaney, who is surprising. but the democratic nature -- the new democratic nature of the district will be tough for bartlett, even though ross perot has -- even though he has an element that the stomach of a typical republican. but he is facing a very differe
? michele bachmann? jeb bush did not run. they got stuck with mitt romney. host: california has gone from a republican to a purple to a solid democratic state. what has changed? ronald reagan winning back in 1984. guest: i am proud to take a little bit of credit for that four at one time being the democratic party chair in california. the republican party is a mirror of the national republican party in the sense that i think they lost track of where the country was moving. republican registration in ronald reagan's day was 63.5% republican. today it is less than 30%. democrats did a good job of registering voters, but the republican party lost all of those people by their extreme right-wing philosophy and policies. host: pete wilson on the issue of immigration. why is that a mirror image? guest: we always had a hard time convincing latinos to vote, to register and to vote. we called them the sleeping giant. the sleeping giant woke up. he will send put an anti- immigration initiative on the ballot. the latino community came alive. a registered. now, they are a power in california and many
and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive seats with a very interesting st
, we don't know what is going to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home in napa valley was broken into on monday. so, she actually has some little housekeeping to take care of. apparently people broken. they don't know what is missing. sort of this bizarre thing. in the event he does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the subtext -- almost a shakespearean subtext -- between steny hoyer and nancy pelosi, they have in turn together on capitol hill in the 1960's and they have been rivals for years. the last 10 or 12 years, competing for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is trying to live up somebody who she -- who would be her successor of choice. there is a lot of trauma and we just don't know where the dominoes will fall until we know her intentions. it >> just to wrap up -- who is in the next generation of would- be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement or if not
for a minute in the battleground states. what about california? if part of you can't get 45% of the vote, much above 40% of the vote in california is not a party about the future. >> and blaming chris christie is exactly maybe what's wrong with the party. you tell me. he should step above it. but can he? >> i think there are a lot of republicans that need to fight back. and you look at this party, jon meacham, this party has lost 5 out of the last 6 elections when it comes to the popular vote. and they had a great victory two years ago, but the same thing happened in 1994. look historically, jon. 1992, bill clinton, a new democrat wins. two years later rejected by a republican revolution. two years later, re-elected. the same thing has happened again. by republicans who have won. republicans won an historic landslide. we were here two years ago. a lot of unhappy democrats. two years later, they're seen as overreaching and rejected by the american people. >> democrats have shown a greater capacity of the modern era to learn from adversity. and the '94 example is the great one. president bush, i
to other races in the country where they could target rick hubble -- republicans. california there have been two factors, which was to turn the congressional map on its head. we are almost able to ignore california even though it is the biggest day, and maybe watch one or two seats. now we're watching a dozen seats to see which party takes control. when it comes to the senate, if you look at the northern part of the country, if you look at montana, north dakota, indiana, and wisconsin, all four of those races are in our categories, and republicans need to win all four of them if they have any hope of getting the majority. in each one of those that they lose, the chance the republicans will gain back control decreases for the perry >> will there be anything that surprise you? our job is toj avoid as many surprises as process. in hopes of we will avoid a surprise, but i would be surprised if there is not a surprise, particularly on the house side. the presidential battleground, i think the senate battle ground, states we know come on the house side, but almost expect there to be a surpris
but actually you can't tell the total number of votes in the nation until california gets around to doing it. you know, some states count them very clean and don't seem to have any problem. >> megyn: how about virginia? is that true of virginia. >> virginia, that has been true. when george allen was defeated for senator six years ago by 6,000 or 7,000 votes, virginia went right down, you know, they went back over that, i believe there was recount or reexpectation of the vote, less than 100 votes changed. it was pretty straightforward. new hampshire is famous for doing that well, too and so forth. other states have had bigger problems. >> bret: we should point out if we put that back up. that was the national popular vote total. that will pop up throughout the night as well. you will see the actual vote total through the night. these are all the states throughout the nation and there you see it as it continues to tick up and for us, after the iowa caucuses, the difference was added, 61256 right now so i don't have to pull out the calculator. >> megyn: didn't you get yelled at by math teacher
postgraduate school in monterey, california. officials say they deliberately mismanaged money. rear admiral charles goet this month relieved of duty as a strike group sailing in the middle east. a military official told cnn there were multiple complaints about him from sub ord nents. 23 officers removed so for this year, marines six, the army 11. the most serious case, army brigadier general sinclaire charged with sexual assault. the navy told us no matter how embarrassing it gets with the relatively high numbers, it's going to continue to announce when it relieves commanders of duty because they say with those ships at sea far from home, if a commander isn't doing his job appropriately, the lives of thousands of sailors could be at risk. so they're willing to put the information out there. the president gets a report from the pentagon this weekend, wolf, about what to do about all of this. >> let us know what he decides to do about it. he's the commander in chief. barbara, thank you. turns out some of hollywood's brightest stars have more political clout than others. who they are, how they
of that is sending george w. bush to california in 2000 and spending $10 million in that state when we refused in the gore campaign to spend a dime on the assumption that if they said they're going to get california, they might get it. they lost it. >> shrummy, good to see you. >> bob shrum, thank you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. live election day coverage from washington, d.c. colorado is another one of the key battleground states in this election. the polls there, scheduled to open in less than ten minutes. cnn's ed lavendera is live in lakewood, colorado. >> reporter: good morning, john. western suburb of denver. romney campaign and obama campaigns will be paying close attention to what happens here. how jefferson county votes, many say, will determine which side wins the state of colorado and its nine electoral votes. that's because the nature of this county is equal parts republican, democrat and independent swing voters. they're looking to turn out the vote in jefferson county. early, 1.7 mill
what the impact will be on the national figures in the race for president. california, washington, hawaii have gone for obama, idahoor romney. no big surprises there for people. as you see there with the big vote, the national vote here, mitt romney still showing up here at 2 percentage points ahead of barack obama. right now the eyes of the obama and romney campaigns are watching the fates of their campaigns and the future of the nation, all coming in as each return comes in. abc 7 is your election station tonight. senior political reporter is live at the obama campaign. he's in chicago. let's check in with him. >> we have a long and uncertain night but don't tell that to the cheerers here at obama head quarters in chicago. they are very upbeat as they watch the results come in. particularly when they have seen the numbers come in in pennsylvania, from wisconsin, from new hampshire. they believe that gives them a clear path. they also say senior staff that i talked to early tonight that they read the tea leaves yesterday when they saw mitt romney in ohio. they say that was, quote
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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